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Picture of the Day

Beam me up, Scotty!

The first full characterization measurement of an accelerator beam in six dimensions could advance the understanding and performance of current and planned accelerators around the world. A team of researchers, led by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, conducted the measurement in a beam test facility at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a replica of the Spallation Neutron Source's linear accelerator, or linac. Previous attempts to fully characterize an accelerator beam fell victim to "the curse of dimensionality," in which measurements in low dimensions become exponentially more difficult in higher dimensions. Shown here: An artistic representation illustrates a measurement of a beam in a particle accelerator, demonstrating how the beam's structural complexity increases when measured in progressively higher dimensions. Each increase in dimension reveals information that was previously hidden.

Visit Website | Image credit: Jill Hemman/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE