Exciting change is on the way! Please join us at nsf.gov for the latest news on NSF-funded research. While the NSF Science360 page and daily newsletter have now been retired, there’s much happening at nsf.gov. You’ll find current research news on the homepage and much more to explore throughout the site. Best of all, we’ve begun to build a brand-new website that will bring together news, social media, multimedia and more in a way that offers visitors a rich, rewarding, user-friendly experience.

Want to continue to receive email updates on the latest NSF research news and multimedia content? On September 23rd we’ll begin sending those updates via GovDelivery. If you’d prefer not to receive them, please unsubscribe now from Science360 News and your email address will not be moved into the new system.

Thanks so much for being part of the NSF Science360 News Service community. We hope you’ll stay with us during this transition so that we can continue to share the many ways NSF-funded research is advancing knowledge that transforms our future.

For additional information, please contact us at NewsTravels@nsf.gov

Picture of the Day

Dousing the flame of disease

A new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall. The findings could enable municipalities to enact measures to limit the spread of the diseases and prepare vaccinations. Health officials can use the occurrence of heavy rainfall to prepare for epidemics roughly one month in advance. A weather-based early warning system could give public health officials sufficient lead time to obtain supplies of intravenous immunoglobin, which is the standard treatment for Guillain-Barre, a potential result of Zika infections. The analysis also pinpointed potential risk factors for clustering of Zika cases in Rio de Janeiro’s neighborhoods.

Visit Website | Image credit: Center for Disease Control and Prevention