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Picture of the Day

Researchers achieve high-definition video streaming at 10,000 times lower power

Wearable cameras, such as Snap Spectacles, promise to share videos of live concerts or surgeries instantaneously with the world. But because these cameras must use smaller batteries to stay lightweight and functional, these devices can't perform high-definition video streaming. Now, engineers have developed a new high-definition video streaming method that doesn't need to be plugged in. Their prototype skips the power-hungry parts and has something else, like a smartphone, process the video instead. They do this using a technique called backscatter, through which a device can share information by reflecting signals that have been transmitted to it. Shown here: a low-power, video-streaming prototype that could be used in next-generation wearable cameras, as well as in many other internet-connected devices.

Visit Website | Image credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington