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Picture of the Day

How do you weigh a galaxy?

A new technique for estimating the mass of galaxies promises more reliable results, especially when applied to large datasets generated by current and future surveys, according to a research team funded by the National Science Foundation. The study is the first to combine the observed full 3-D motions of several of the Milky Way's satellite galaxies with extensive computer simulations to obtain a high-accuracy estimate for the mass of our home galaxy. Determining the mass of galaxies plays a crucial part in unraveling fundamental mysteries about the architecture of the universe. According to current cosmological models, a galaxy's visible matter, such as stars, gas and dust, accounts for a mere 15 percent of its mass. The remaining 85 percent is believed to reside in dark matter, a mysterious component that never has been observed and whose physical properties remain largely unknown. The vast majority of a galaxy's mass (mostly dark matter) is located in its halo, a vast, surrounding region containing few, if any, stars and whose shape is largely unknown. The authors hope to apply their method to the ever-growing data as they become available by current and future galactic surveys such as the Gaia space observatory and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

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