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Jennifer Dionne and Mark Braverman named recipients of 2019 Alan T. Waterman awards

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has named materials scientist Jennifer Dionne and computer scientist Mark Braverman the recipients of this year's Alan T. Waterman Award. Dionne, Stanford University associate professor of materials science, is developing techniques and tools to image dynamic physical, chemical and biological processes with extremely high resolution. Her research is enabling new knowledge to help solve global challenges in biomedicine, energy and computing. Braverman, Princeton University professor of computer science, studies complexity theory, algorithms and the limits of what's possible computationally. Braverman's research focuses on complexity, including looking at algorithms for optimization, which, when applied, might mean planning a route -- how to get from point A to point B in the most efficient way possible. The Waterman Award annually recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by NSF. Researchers 40 years of age or younger, or up to 10 years post Ph.D., are eligible.

Visit Website | Image credit: Jennifer Dionne and David Kelly Crow