Exciting change is on the way! Please join us at nsf.gov for the latest news on NSF-funded research. While the NSF Science360 page and daily newsletter have now been retired, there’s much happening at nsf.gov. You’ll find current research news on the homepage and much more to explore throughout the site. Best of all, we’ve begun to build a brand-new website that will bring together news, social media, multimedia and more in a way that offers visitors a rich, rewarding, user-friendly experience.

Want to continue to receive email updates on the latest NSF research news and multimedia content? On September 23rd we’ll begin sending those updates via GovDelivery. If you’d prefer not to receive them, please unsubscribe now from Science360 News and your email address will not be moved into the new system.

Thanks so much for being part of the NSF Science360 News Service community. We hope you’ll stay with us during this transition so that we can continue to share the many ways NSF-funded research is advancing knowledge that transforms our future.

For additional information, please contact us at NewsTravels@nsf.gov

Top Story

Researchers use acoustic forces to print droplets that couldn't be printed before

National Science Foundation-funded researchers have developed a new printing method that uses soundwaves to generate droplets from liquids with an unprecedented range of composition and viscosity. This technique could finally enable the manufacturing of many new biopharmaceuticals, cosmetic, and food, and expand the possibilities of optical and conductive materials. Liquid droplets are used in many applications from printing ink on paper to creating microcapsules for drug delivery. Inkjet printing is the most common technique used to pattern liquid droplets, but it's only suitable for liquids that are roughly 10 times more viscous than water. Yet many fluids of interest to researchers are far more viscous. Thanks to gravity, any liquid can drip -- from water dripping out of a faucet to the century-long pitch drop experiment. To enhance drop formation, the research team relies on generating sound waves. These pressure waves have been typically used to defy gravity, as in the case of acoustic levitation. Now, the researchers are using them to assist gravity, dubbing this new technique acoustophoretic printing.

Visit Website | Image credit: Daniele Foresti, Lori K. Sanders, Jennifer A. Lewis/Harvard University