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Explosions of universe's first stars spewed powerful jets

Several hundred million years after the Big Bang, the very first stars flared into the universe as massively bright accumulations of hydrogen and helium gas. Within the cores of these first stars, extreme, thermonuclear reactions forged the first heavier elements, including carbon, iron and zinc. These first stars were likely immense, short-lived fireballs, and scientists have assumed that they exploded as similarly spherical supernovae. Now, National Science Foundation-funded astronomers have found that these first stars may have blown apart in a more powerful, asymmetric fashion, spewing forth jets that were violent enough to eject heavy elements into neighboring galaxies. These elements ultimately served as seeds for the second generation of stars, some of which can still be observed today. In a newly published paper, the researchers report a strong abundance of zinc in HE 1327-2326, an ancient, surviving star that is among the universe's second generation of stars. They believe the star could only have acquired such a large amount of zinc after an asymmetric explosion of one of the very first stars had enriched its birth gas cloud.

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