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Biofungicide contains beneficial microbe to help plants fight fungal disease

The Environmental Protection Agency has registered BASF's new Velondis brand biofungicide seed treatment formulations, which contain a patented beneficial microbe to help plants fight fungal disease. With potential applications in agriculture, horticulture and forestry, the products are designed to boost the protection of seedlings and plants from key soil-borne diseases. The bacteria produce a beneficial biofilm and antimicrobial components that promote systemic resistance within the plant, resulting in suppression of disease organisms that attach to root systems. Two of the biofungicides have additional components that help plants produce a more vigorous root system, resulting in improved plant growth and yield potential. The biofungicides will be used in different facets of agriculture, and will initially be labeled for use with soybeans this spring.

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