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Today's Video

A time-lapse of the Vavilov Ice Cap's collapse

In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study. Glaciers and ice caps like Vavilov cover nearly 300,000 square miles of Earth's surface and hold about a foot of potential sea-level rise. Scientists have never seen such acceleration in this kind of ice cap before and, according to the researchers, this finding raises the possibility that other, currently stable ice caps may be more vulnerable than expected.

Provided by Whyjay Zheng/Cornell University/LANDSAT imagery by NASA/USGS
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