Exciting change is on the way! Please join us at nsf.gov for the latest news on NSF-funded research. While the NSF Science360 page and daily newsletter have now been retired, there’s much happening at nsf.gov. You’ll find current research news on the homepage and much more to explore throughout the site. Best of all, we’ve begun to build a brand-new website that will bring together news, social media, multimedia and more in a way that offers visitors a rich, rewarding, user-friendly experience.

Want to continue to receive email updates on the latest NSF research news and multimedia content? On September 23rd we’ll begin sending those updates via GovDelivery. If you’d prefer not to receive them, please unsubscribe now from Science360 News and your email address will not be moved into the new system.

Thanks so much for being part of the NSF Science360 News Service community. We hope you’ll stay with us during this transition so that we can continue to share the many ways NSF-funded research is advancing knowledge that transforms our future.

For additional information, please contact us at NewsTravels@nsf.gov

Today's Video

New printable and flexible ceramic bone grafts could be a game changer

The transplanting of bone tissue, known as bone grafting, typically involves allograft, which is bone from a deceased donor, or autograft, which comes from the patient's own body. With support from the National Science Foundation, materials scientist Ramille Shah, Ph. D, of Northwestern University, and materials engineer Adam Jakus, Ph. D, were able to validate the commercialization potential of a new 3D printable synthetic material they call "Hyperelastic Bone™," which they foresee will be a vast improvement over the current options, including other manmade materials.

Provided by National Science Foundation
Runtime: 3:52