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Today's Video

Cars of the future could recharge wirelessly, bolstering logistics

Electric vehicles may one day be able to recharge while driving down the highway, drawing wireless power directly from plates installed in the road that would make it possible to drive hundreds -- if not thousands -- of miles without having to plug in. While the idea may sound like science fiction, engineers are making it a reality. Over the past two years, Khurram Afridi, assistant professor of electrical, computer and energy engineering at University of Colorado Boulder, has developed a proof of concept for wireless power transfer that transfers electrical energy through electric fields at very high frequencies. The ability to send large amounts of energy across greater physical distances could one day allow the technology to expand beyond small consumer electronics, such as cell phones, and begin powering bigger things, such as automobiles.

Provided by University of Colorado Boulder
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