Picture of the Day

Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?

As growth makes neighborhoods more crowded for humans, it's also concentrating carnivores such as bobcats and coyotes into the remaining green spaces, leading them to interact with each other more frequently than they do in wild areas, according to research in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C. The citizen science study looks at how carnivores interact with each other when they're sharing space in small suburban forest patches. With the help of 557 volunteers and 1,260 remote cameras set up in suburban, exurban, rural and wild areas, the researchers documented 6,413 carnivores among nearly 43,000 images of wildlife. Carnivore species included bobcats and coyotes along with smaller gray and red foxes. In general, the smaller carnivores steer clear of the larger ones. Some theories suggest that smaller carnivores might stay closer to people, using them as "human shields" from larger predators. But that wasn't borne out by the study.

Visit Website | Image credit: eMammal Project