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Top Story

Good vibrations: smart access to homes and cars using fingers

VibWrite, a low-cost smart access system that senses finger vibrations to verify users, could eventually be used to gain access to homes, apartment buildings, cars, appliances and anything with a solid surface. The market for smart security access systems is expected to grow rapidly, reaching nearly $10 billion by 2022, according to the researchers who developed the technology. Today’s smart security access systems mainly rely on traditional techniques that use intercoms, cameras, cards or fingerprints to authenticate users. But these systems require costly equipment, complex hardware installation and diverse maintenance needs. VibWrite is different from traditional, password-based approaches, which validate passwords instead of legitimate users. It’s also different from behavioral biometrics-based solutions, which typically involve touch screens, fingerprint readers or other costly hardware and lead to privacy concerns and "smudge attacks" that trace oily residues on surfaces from fingers.

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