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Top Story

Organic electronics could lead to cheap, wearable medical sensors

Future fitness trackers could soon add blood-oxygen levels to the list of vital signs measured with new technology. Engineers have created a pulse oximeter sensor composed of all-organic optoelectronics that uses red and green light. The red and green organic light-emitting diodes are detected by the organic photodiode. The device measures arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate as accurately as conventional, silicon-based pulse oximeters. By switching from silicon to an organic, or carbon-based, design, the researchers were able to create a device that could ultimately be thin, cheap and flexible enough to be slapped on like a Band-Aid during that jog around the track or hike up the hill. The engineers put the new prototype up against a conventional pulse oximeter and found that the pulse and oxygen readings were just as accurate.

Visit Website | Image credit: Yasser Khan, Arias Research Group, UC Berkeley